Law to allow parents to publicly remember their child completes all stages in Dáil and Seanad

A law to allow parents to publicly remember their child completes all stages in Dáil and Seanad.

The changes will allow parents to publicly remember their child, and will allow for the identification of the person accused of the murder/manslaughter of the child.

The Minister for Justice, Helen McEntee,has worked with the members of both Houses to progress the Children (Amendment) Bill 2020 which has now been approved by the Seanad and the Dáil, and will be forwarded to the President for signature.

Once the Bill has been signed by the President, the Minister for Justice will sign the necessary commencement order, and expects it to come into force in very early May. The legislation will remove the restrictions on reporting the identities of deceased children with respect to past and future cases, while retaining the protection for living children. The restrictions have prevented parents from speaking publicly about their deceased child in cases where the child was unlawfully killed.

Minister McEntee said: “I am conscious of the deep hurt felt by families around the restrictions on reporting the identities of deceased children who have been the victims of criminal acts.

“I appreciate the cooperation of members of both Houses in progressing the Children (Amendment) Bill 2020 which has now been approved by the Seanad and the Dáil, and will be forwarded to the President for signature. I would like to thank Senator McDowell and Deputy O’Callaghan in particular for their early engagement on this issue and helping to bring it through the Houses as quickly as possible.

“This legislation will remove the restrictions on reporting the identities of deceased children with respect to past and future cases, while retaining the protection for living children.”

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